The Bushes

Portrait of a Dynasty

Peter Schweizer

From Amazon:

Based on hours of unprecedented interviews with members of the Bush family, The Bushestells the inside story of the unique dynasty at the heart of American power.

As well as laying out the secretive family’s inner workings, this intimate and fascinating group portrait probes into such sensitive matters as their dealings in the oil business, George W.’s turbulent youth, and Jeb’s likely run for the presidency in 2008.

In this first full-scale biography, Peter and Rochelle Schweizer insightfully explore the secrets of the Bushes’ rise from obscurity to unprecedented influence. The family’s free-flowing, pragmatic, and opportunistic style consciously distinguishes them from previous political dynasties; they consider themselves the “un-Kennedys.” But with their abiding emphasis on loyalty and networking, the Bushes’ continuing success seems assured–making this book essential reading for anyone who cares about America’s future.

Pot Shards: Fragments of a Life Lived in CIA, the White House, and the Two Koreas

51TiN2RPLlL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_The long awaited book written by “Uncle Don”. Of course the book is completely screened by the agency, but still a good read.

Donald P. Gregg

From the publisher:

Pot Shards is a memoir, based on the author’s memorable experiences. Donald P. Gregg spent thirty-one years as an operations officer in CIA and ten years in the White House under presidents Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan and Vice President George H. W. Bush. Pot Shards is his memoir. It tells of a philosophy major who graduated from college in 1951 and immediately joined CIA when told, “You’ll jump out of airplanes and save the world!” With raucous humor, he describes his parachute training and arctic survival course in Idaho. His book is a window into the Cold War-era CIA, both its failings (twenty years in a Chinese jail for a close friend) and unheralded successes, including Gregg’s role in saving the life of Kim Dae-jung, a Korean political dissident who later, as president, won the Nobel Peace Prize. Gregg colorfully describes his tours in Japan, Burma, Vietnam, and South Korea.

Life and Death in Shanghai

Life_and_death_in_ShanghaiThis book is discussed in show 388 but referred to on other shows as well. In this show the book is mentioned in the context of Oil (as always).

Mentioned again in show 440

From the book of knowledge:

The book tells the story of Cheng’s arrest during the first days of the Cultural Revolution, her imprisonment, release, persecution, efforts to leave China, and early life in exile.

Cheng was arrested in late 1966 after Red Guards looted her home. During her imprisonment, she was pressured to make a false confession that she was a spy for “the imperialists” because for many years after the death of her husband she had continued to work as a senior partner for Shell in Shanghai. Cheng refused to provide a false confession, and was tortured as a result.

Dreams from My Father

From the publisher:

In this lyrical, unsentimental, and compelling memoir, the son of a black African father and a white American mother searches for a workable meaning to his life as a black American. It begins in New York, where Barack Obama learns that his father a figure he knows more as a myth than as a man has been killed in a car accident. This sudden death inspires an emotional odyssey first to a small town in Kansas, from which he retraces the migration of his mother s family to Hawaii, and then to Kenya, where he meets the African side of his family, confronts the bitter truth of his father s life, and at last reconciles his divided inheritance.

Asylum

asylum-hollywood-tales-from-my-great-depression-brain-dis-ease-recovery-and-being-my-mothers-sonDuring the discussion about adderall on show 421 Adam Curry mentioned his interview with Joe Pantoliano. The book discussed is called “Asylum”

From the publisher:

In this deeply moving and resourceful memoir, beloved actor-director and <em>New York Times</em> bestselling author Joe Pantoliano takes aim at the stigma attached to what he calls “brain dis-ease” by writing candidly and humorously about his own journey through clinical depression and addiction. Most people know Joe Pantoliano from his memorable roles in such blockbuster movies as <em>The Matrix</em>, <em>Risky Business</em>, <em>The Fugitive</em>, and <em>Memento</em>, or from his Emmy-winning performance on <em>The Sopranos</em>. But despite all this success, the actor, known as “Joey Pants,” struggled with what he later found out was clinical depression—or brain dis-ease, as he calls it. Asylum is the story of Joe’s quest for the Hollywood success he was sure would cure him, and the painful downhill spiral into depression and addiction that followed his success. Weaving deeply personal experience together with informative discourse, this memoir creates an unflinchingly honest portrayal of the true nature of the disease, as well as Joe’s own eventual diagnosis, recovery, and ongoing efforts to educate others and remove the stigma from mental illness.